Stanford’s final Treasure Market benefits Cantor Arts Center

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Stanford’s final Treasure Market benefits Cantor Arts Center

Stanford’s final Treasure Market benefits Cantor Arts Center

Planners for the final Treasure Market at Stanford University are working feverishly to assure that the event they’re officially calling “The Last Hurrah!” will be a splendid occasion.

The biennial sale, first started in 1958, is set for March 31 and April 1-2. Over the years the gala has generated close to $3.7 million to the Cantor Arts Center’s fund to acquire new works of art.

Attendees will see an incredible array

This mother-of-pearl and embroidered silk fan, which is said to have belonged originally to the Empress Eugenie of France's House of Bonaparte, will be offered at the final Stanford Treasure Market. (Photo courtesy of Treasure Market)
This mother-of-pearl and embroidered silk fan, which is said to have belonged originally to the Empress Eugenie of France’s House of Bonaparte, will be offered at the final Stanford Treasure Market. (Photo courtesy of Treasure Market) 

of donations from Peninsula collectors, members of the Stanford community and other donors, with an emphasis on artwork, porcelain, rugs, crystal, silver, furniture, books, jewelry and furs. One year, I snapped up a piece of 18th-century French silver marked $200. A pal scored a cookbook signed by Julia Child priced at $20.

Among the items available this year is a pair of 19th-century Chinese doors believed to have been part of a Beijing family compound, or group of houses. These architectural artifacts were found at a Thai antiques mart.

In the jewelry department, patrons can ogle an incredible mother-of-pearl and embroidered silk fan said to have belonged originally to the Empress Eugenie (1826-1920) of France’s House of Bonaparte. There’s also a marvelous group of “gem-quality” turquoise jewelry up for sale.

Among the collectibles offered will be a Western Union telegraph and a collection of original press teletype wire bulletins announcing the Kennedy assassination. For sports fans there is a 1972 World Series baseball autographed by winning Oakland A’s Hall of Fame star Reggie Jackson.

Art Deco fans will find a number of decorative pieces, including an impressive soup tureen in the coveted “Rothschild” pattern by Hungarian porcelain maker Herend.

As is always the case, paintings are aplenty. Offered are a Carmel seascape by Paul Dougherty, a landscape by Johannes Janson, a Sol Le Witt aquatint and a charcoal drawing by David Nash.

The scene for the 2017 Treasure Market is the Arrillaga Center for Sports and Recreation, 341 Galvez St. at Campus Drive East. Things kick off with a ticketed $250 preview from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 31, which includes the opening celebration that night. No sales or holds are allowed during these hours, but buyers get an advance look at the goodies on parade.

Tickets are $100 (or $75 for Cantor members) for the opening night soiree with wine and hors d’oeuvres, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., with its Asian-inspired theme. I have a feeling those doors I mentioned above will make a dramatic backdrop!

On the April 1-2 weekend, the admission price drops to just $5 for members of the public. The sale continues from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.April 1 and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 2. Parking’s available in the Galvez lot. Details: 650-326-4533, or www.museum.stanford.edu.

Sale organizers continue to accept upscale donations at 3585 Haven Ave., Suite C, Menlo Park, from 9:30 a.m.to noon on Wednesdays until March 22. Information: 650-468-1724.

Living history: Historical characters will bring Saratoga’s rich past to life at the city’s fifth annual Blossom Festival on March 18. Produced by the Saratoga Historical Foundation, the event will also feature antique cars, live music, an art show and activities for children. Details: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Heritage Orchard and Saratoga Civic Center, 13777 Fruitvale Ave. Free admission. Gourmet food trucks on site. Details: 408-867-4311, or www.saratogahistory.com.

A passing: Noted East Bay antiques dealer and art history scholar Thomas Livingston died Jan. 24. He was 80. The Oakland resident and his life partner, Karel Wessel, were original exhibitors at the San Francisco Fall Antiques Show. They established Thomas Livingston Antiques, on Ashby Avenue in Berkeley, in 1977, moved to San Francisco in 1989, then back to Berkeley in 2009.

Contact Yvaska at steve.yvaska@sbcglobal.net.

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Published at Wed, 01 Mar 2017 10:00:16 +0000