East Bay home and garden news and advice

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East Bay home and garden news and advice

East Bay home and garden news and advice

East Bay home and garden news and advice | East Bay TimesEast Bay home and garden news and advice | East Bay TimesPleasanton sewage plant giving away free treated water to close for 18 monthsWoodworkers piece together some fun, help their neighbors, tooBay Area antiques world lost some special folks in 2016

http://www.eastbaytimes.com http://www.eastbaytimes.com http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/32×32-ebt.png?w=32 http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/23/dublin-plant-giving-away-free-sewer-water-to-close-for-18-months/ http://www.eastbaytimes.com/?p=4402074 <div><img src=”http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/20150827__watersave1.jpg?w=645&amp;h=430″ class=”ff-og-image-inserted”/></div><p>PLEASANTON — With storms easing drought worries, California’s first water treatment plant to give away free recycled water to homeowners is closing for at least 18 months for an $18.2 million plant expansion.</p> <p>The Dublin San Ramon Services District announced this week it will shutter its popular recycled water fill station in Pleasanton until spring 2018 during expansion of the plant, which processes effluent for use as irrigation water.</p> <p>Officials fear keeping the popular fill station open would create traffic headaches and safety problems for the many people who drive in to fill up tanks, pails and jugs with recycled water to irrigate their lawns and landscaping.</p> <p>The services district could have relocated the fill station and kept it open, but the cost to do that wouldn’t be worth it in a year with promising water supplies, the agency’s board decided Tuesday night.</p> <p>“We haven’t had mandatory irrigation restrictions in the Tri-Valley since last June,” said Richard Halket, the services district’s board president. “If we have to reinstate irrigation restrictions, we will look at options for operating a recycled water fill station for residents.”</p> <p>It would have cost at least $170,000 to relocate the fill station and an estimated $500,000 a year in staff time to operate and manage it, according a report to the agency’s water board.</p> <p>The last scheduled day for the plant to open to the public is Wednesday, but it won’t open that day if it rains.</p> <p>The Dublin-based water district opened the fill station in 2014 when state water allocations to Dublin, Livermore and Pleasanton were slashed to 5 percent of requested supplies.</p> <p>Since then, more than 10 other recycled water fill stations were opened around California, including ones in Martinez, Oakley, Livermore, Brentwood, Scotts Valley and Los Angeles.</p> <p>Plant operators said they wanted to give homeowners a way to reduce their potable water use and hold down steep bills when drought rates were in effect.</p> <p>Renee Olsen, a Dublin San Ramon district spokeswoman, said her agency isn’t stepping back from recycled water but rather focusing more on delivering it through purple pipes to fields and landscaping at parks, schools, street medians and common areas.</p> <p>“The fill station was started as a way to help people in a drought emergency,” she said.</p> <p>The expansion of the recycled water plant in Pleasanton will enable the district to produce 70 percent more recycled water to meet peak demand on hot summer days, Olsen said.</p> <p>The fill station gave away 28.2 million gallons of highly treated effluent in 2015 to some 3,900 people. Still, that amount of water amounted to only 2.7 percent of the recycled water used in the district that year as most of the treated effluent was delivered in purple pipes.</p> <p>The Dublin San Ramon Services board will decide in 2018 whether to reopen the recycled water fill station, she said</p> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 23 Dec 2016 21:54:13 +0000 Denis Cuff article Pleasanton sewage plant giving away free treated water to close for 18 months http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/23/dublin-plant-giving-away-free-sewer-water-to-close-for-18-months/ Fill station is not as crucial in year with promising water supplies, says Dublin San Ramon Services District http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/20150827__watersave1.jpg?w=645&h=430 en-US text/html http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/23/dublin-plant-giving-away-free-sewer-water-to-close-for-18-months/ Environment & Science Home & Garden Latest Headlines News Drought Environment http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/23/woodworkers-piece-together-some-fun-help-their-neighbors-too/ http://www.eastbaytimes.com/?p=4396037 <div><img src=”http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cct-woodwork-1224-02.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=769″ class=”ff-og-image-inserted”/></div><p>PLEASANTON — When Ann Garske moved into the Stoneridge Creek seniors community 2½ years ago, she found herself with a small closet she didn’t know what to do with. She asked fellow resident Arnold Joyal for suggestions and recommendations.</p> <p>“Arnold came in and took measurements; he said he’d had a couple of other folks ask for this before,” said Garske, who before long was the proud owner of a new wine shelf custom-made for that small space.</p> <p>That she and others at Stoneridge Creek have shelves, wine glass holders, fancy holiday candles, chairs and various other crafted wood objects is thanks to the largesse of a group of resident woodworkers, with access to an on-premises wood shop and its serious machines.</p> <p>At the northeast corner of the property where almost 600 seniors live is a 20-by-40-foot  building, built in the same style, and sporting the same colors, as all the buildings on the grounds. It was part of Stoneridge Creek’s initial construction in 2013.</p> <p>Inside is an impressive stable of saws, sanders, lathes, grinders, a drill press, a planer, a joiner and myriad small tools used in crafting everything from small candle holders to large furniture. A central sawdust vacuum is attached to the larger machines.</p> <p>“I helped put a bug in their ear to build this,” said Joyal, 79. “I think it’s probably a good selling point for this place.”</p> <p>Apparently. As of Christmas week, 33 people, a handful of women among them, have clearance to use the shop, having proven they can use the machines and tools safely. While many of them are longtime woodworker hobbyists, others are newer to woodworking.</p> <p>One of those is Rick Levesque, who moved to Stoneridge Creek a few months ago. A retired Lawrence Livermore Laboratory design engineer, he is well-versed in the ways of metal working. “In general, I’m not a woodworker,” he said,”but it translates over pretty well.”</p> <p>He is working on a fairly elaborate “hobby bench” whose plans look more like a desk than a bench. “It is to fit in a small space in my current villa,” said Levesque, whose detailed draft drawings are far more elaborate than those for most wood shop projects here. Using $50-a-sheet birch plywood, he’s taking the utmost care.</p> <p>“You don’t want to go chompin’ on it like a woodchuck — you want to plan ahead,” he said.</p> <p>Others here have been doing this for decades. Phil Wire has done it for 50 years as a way to unwind after work. Lately, he’s been taking 100-year-old redwood from a dismantled winery to build decorative birdhouses, and has made Christmas candles. “People here went crazy for these,” the 90-year-old Wire said.</p> <p>Phil Mueller, 84, was a metal machinist who took up woodworking after his retirement 25 years ago. He’s one of the regulars here who spend a lot of their time not only on their own projects but on fixing shelves, flower boxes, chairs and other furniture not only for residents but for the center itself.</p> <p>“We only charge for the materials — we’re cheap!” Mueller said. The woodworkers also accept donations, used to pay for maintaining the wood shop.</p> <p>Dan Ashton, now 92, has been woodworking since he was in high school. He said the wood shop’s biggest community project was probably when, about two years ago, Stoneridge Creek’s activities committee asked whether the wood shop crew could build some display easels. “Some” turned out to be 40, and 10 more were requested later.</p> <p>“We made them for $8.12 each; they’re $80 new,” Ashton said. “There’s a measure of satisfaction in that, for sure.”</p> <p>Joyal proudly pointed to a rack for binders at the Stoneridge Creek main lobby desk, and to shelving in the formal library holding bound volumes of military members’ memoirs, as other work the wood shop has turned out.</p> <p>“We have people who want to do things, and they’ve run out of projects to do for themselves,” he said.</p> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 23 Dec 2016 17:22:56 +0000 Sam Richards article Woodworkers piece together some fun, help their neighbors, too http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/23/woodworkers-piece-together-some-fun-help-their-neighbors-too/ Residents of the Stoneridge Creek senior living complex in Pleasanton use well-stocked shop for their own projects and to help their neighbors http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cct-woodwork-1224-02.jpg?w=1024&h=769 en-US text/html http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/23/woodworkers-piece-together-some-fun-help-their-neighbors-too/ Community News Home & Garden Latest Headlines Lifestyle News Uncategorized Seniors http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/22/antiques-world-lost-some-special-folks-in-2016/ https://www.eastbaytimes.com?p=4398591&preview_id=4398591 <div><img src=”http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cct-yvaska-1225.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=718″ class=”ff-og-image-inserted”/></div><p>As December draws to an end, I want to recognize some of the dear people associated with the antiques, history and non-profit worlds who died in 2016.</p> <p>I met <strong>Lareda Horbeck</strong> about a decade ago when she popped in at the newspaper. Lareda was  visiting family and figured the area antiques guy should know of the 300-mile-long “Junk Jaunt” in Nebraska she helped organize. Every Christmas Lareda kindly invited me, saying I had a place to stay. I have yet to make it to the Heartland, but if you will, the next massive sale takes place Sept. 22-24, 2017 (www.junkjaunt.com).</p> <p>The antiques community lost one of the jewels in its crown with the death of <strong>Sue Okey</strong>, who was in the business for more than 40 years. Sue was known for having gorgeous jewelry and exhibited widely at the Hillsborough and Bustamante shows, among others. Her treasure hunts for rare, unusual pieces for her customers took her frequently around the United States and to Europe.</p> <p>I met <strong>Jack Wilson</strong> 15 years ago at the Milpitas Historical Society. A former Marine and Navy officer, Jack taught at Newark High and was a pastor at Newark Presbyterian Church. If you ever visited him and his lovely wife, Arlene, at the “ranch,” you know that Jack’s tales brought history to life.</p> <p><strong>Beverly Flippen</strong> was a dynamo — the type of person who made things happen. An avid collector, she started a popular event at The Forum in Cupertino where residents would bring their treasures to be evaluated by appraisers, including yours truly.</p> <p><strong>Mabel Brix</strong> was an elegant, sagacious business owner with a generous heart. Mabel owned Randall’s, an emporium carrying fine art, silver and porcelain. In fact, hers was the only outlet in our region that stocked the revered Royal Danish Copenhagen china pattern called “Flora Danica” — a nod, I am convinced, to Mabel’s Danish heritage and exquisite taste.</p> <p>The sight of <strong>Mary Lou Lyon</strong> always took my breath away. You see, the plain-speaking antiques guru often wore her sensational American Indian jewelry. She was the program chair for the Antiques Club at the Union Church of Cupertino and a former teacher of California history.</p> <p><strong>Irene Nordling Underwood</strong> conducted high-caliber estate sales in the Bay Area for years. While Irene had two degrees and was a member of the American Association of Appraisers, she may have learned her most valuable lessons from her antiques vendor/mother, Ida. Irene’s daughter, Lesley, is a gifted artist and an appraiser continuing the family legacy.</p> <p><strong>Stephen D’Arrigo Jr.</strong> took part in D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge was a generous donor to the St. Christopher’s  Antique Show (Jan. 27-29, 2017). Another St. Chris loss was <strong>Pat Miner</strong>. She was a dedicated kitchen volunteer with a winning smile.</p> <p><strong>Saliem “Tommy” Thomas</strong>, former executive chef at Almaden Country Club, was a whiz at using antiques and collectibles for spectacular “tablescapes.” At Thanksgiving each guest would discover a glass receptacle (Westmoreland, circa 1960s) fashioned in the shape of a hen on a nest, brimming with luscious soup.</p> <p><strong>Don Heaney</strong>, all-around nice guy, avid golfer and dedicated antiques student, died too soon at age 66. He was the only person I have ever known to collect rug beaters — and had amassed 40 or 50 of them. Don also hunted down Christmas pins for his dear wife, Jan.</p> <p>To all, hail and farewell.</p> <p><em>Contact Yvaska at steve.yvaska@sbcglobal.net.</em></p> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 22 Dec 2016 18:00:32 +0000 Steven Wayne Yvaska article Bay Area antiques world lost some special folks in 2016 https://www.mercurynews.com/2016/12/22/antiques-world-lost-some-special-folks-in-2016/ These standouts in the antiques, art, history and nonprofit worlds touched our lives. http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cct-yvaska-1225.jpg?w=1024&h=718 en-US text/html http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2016/12/22/antiques-world-lost-some-special-folks-in-2016/ Eat & Drink Home & Garden Latest Headlines Lifestyle News Obituaries Antiques

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