East Bay home and garden news and advice

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East Bay home and garden news and advice

East Bay home and garden news and advice

East Bay home and garden news and advice | East Bay TimesEast Bay home and garden news and advice | East Bay TimesA tale of 2 antiques shows: St. Christopher’s, Oakland MuseumMarni Jameson: Passing the family torchKeeping plants safe in winter freezes

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eastbaytimes.com%2Flifestyle%2Fhome-garden%2Ffeed%2F&max=5 http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eastbaytimes.com%2Flifestyle%2Fhome-garden%2Ffeed%2F&max=5 http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/32×32-ebt.png?w=32 http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/01/05/a-tale-of-2-antiques-shows-st-christophers-oakland-museum/ https://www.eastbaytimes.com?p=4510256&preview_id=4510256 <p>This is a tale of two sales. One small, one large. Both are beloved.</p> <p>The 47th annual <a href=”http://www.stchrisladiesguild.org/antique-show.html”>St. Christopher Ladies’ Guild Antiques Show</a> happens Jan. 27-29. With fewer than 25 vendors on hand, this is a cozy event but one that draws quite a crowd.</p> <p>Wisely, planners see to it that there is a wide array of merchandise on parade. Among the sellers will be Bonnie Garza with vintage clothes and accessories by makers like Hermes and Judith Leiber. Christine Woodward shows furniture and small treasures. The people from Golden State Phonographs have disc and cylinder-style phonographs.</p> <p>Veteran merchants Barbara and Sal Falcone will display coins, paper money and “mantiques” — militaria, sports items, tokens, plus vintage San Jose memorabilia. Berkeley expert Elizabeth Norris offers vintage posters, and Sylvia Davis specializes in silver.</p> <p>Look for goodies galore on view from longtime sellers Martha Bedford, Debra Anderson, Jim Dyer, Carol Robichaud, Eduardo Massa and Cherie Gronnel.</p> <p>Once you finish shopping, it’s time to indulge in lunch or dinner. The menu boasts savory Italian dishes, plus a to-die-for pepper-steak sandwich. Save room for mud pie, if you dare. And don’t forget to head to the Pavilion Tent with its flower and garden shop, gifts and home-prepared cakes, jams and their famous waffle cookies, pizzelles.</p> <p>Once more, I’ll take part. On Jan. 27, I will greet visitors from 1 to 3 p.m. On Jan. 28 at 1 p.m., I am giving a program titled “Let’s Talk Antiques: Where We Stand in 2017.” Then on Jan. 29 there are free evaluations of one keepsake per person from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. You can make an early-bird reservation for the 10 a.m. hour with a $10 donation; call Chrissie at 408-755-0273.</p> <p>You’ll find St. Christopher’s at 2278 Booksin Ave., San Jose. Show hours: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Jan. 27-28. Restaurant open until 9 p.m. On Jan. 29, the hours will be 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Admission: $6. Details: antiqueshow@stchrisladiesguild.org. All monies raised benefit parish, school and community outreach programs.</p> <p>— The other sale I want to crow about is gargantuan. It’s the <a href=”https://whiteelephantsale.org/”>Oakland Museum Women’s Board White Elephant Sale</a> on Jan. 29.</p> <p>This shindig is actually a preview of the “real thing” held March 4-5. Each year, organizers allow the public an opportunity to shop early. Savvy shoppers arrive in hopes of super deals. And they snag them in spades!</p> <p>The merchandise — all of it donated to help the Oakland Museum of California — is organized and displayed in an oversize warehouse. You might think you are in a department store, with overhead signs leading customers to furniture, art, books, jewelry, toys, sporting goods, clothing, tools, silver and china, garden items and more.</p> <img class=” lazyautosizes lazyload” src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/white-elephant2.jpg?w=620&amp;crop=0%2C0px%2C100%2C9999px” alt=”A volunteer shows a customer a ceramic statue from the 1930s during an earlier edition of the annual White Elephant Sale in Oakland, whose proceeds benefit the Oakland Museum of California. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)” width=”2958″/>A volunteer shows a customer a ceramic statue from the 1930s during an earlier edition of the annual White Elephant Sale in Oakland. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)  <p>While the sale occurs near the Fruitvale BART station and a free shuttle service is provided, I know some people will undoubtedly wish to take their own vehicles. Just know that parking is very tight. Since you’ll have some distance to cover, wear supportive shoes. Bring a water bottle and a tote. And you get a bonus: You’ll make new pals waiting in line to check out. Be patient.</p> <p>The “Preview Sale” runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 333 Lancaster St., Oakland. For $15 advance tickets, go to www.whiteelephantsale.org. Tickets at the door, $20. Children under 12 admitted free with adult, but no strollers are allowed. If you have donations, call 510-839-5919.</p> <p><strong>More show news</strong></p> <p>— You’ve got until Jan. 15 to take in the wondrous and hugely popular LEGO exhibit at the <a href=”http://www.moah.org/”>Museum of American Heritage</a>. Ogle the trains and miniature cities at 351 Homer St., Palo Alto. Admission: $3 per person (cash only). Hours: 11 a.m.-3:45 p.m. Friday-Sunday. No strollers. Details: 650-321-1004, or www.moah.org.</p> <p>— Sadly, the legendary biennial event that benefits Stanford’s Cantor Museum of  Art acquisitions fund will end after this spring’s show. Dubbed <a href=”https://museum.stanford.edu/participate/programs_events_treasure_market.html”>“The Last Hurrah,” the Treasure Market</a> art and antiques event will happen with great fanfare one last time — March 31, April 1 and 2.</p> <p>I’ll have more information as the dates draw near, but for now, the committee is still accepting donations of artwork, china, crystal, silver, jewelry, collectible books, linens and carpets. Donations may be dropped off from 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays through March 22 at 3585 Haven Ave., Suite C, Menlo Park. Details: 650-468-1724. If you’d like to volunteer, call 650-326-4533.</p> <p><em>Contact Yvaska at steve.yvaska@sbcglobal.net.</em></p> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 05 Jan 2017 18:00:48 +0000 Steven Wayne Yvaska article A tale of 2 antiques shows: St. Christopher’s, Oakland Museum https://www.mercurynews.com/2017/01/05/a-tale-of-2-antiques-shows-st-christophers-oakland-museum/ One show is a small high-end one; the other is a massive warehouse sale. http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/white-elephant1.jpg?w=1024&h=732 @eastbaytimes http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/white-elephant1.jpg?w=640 summary_large_image en-US text/html http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/01/05/a-tale-of-2-antiques-shows-st-christophers-oakland-museum/ Home & Garden Lifestyle Antiques http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/01/05/marni-jameson-passing-the-family-torch/ https://www.eastbaytimes.com?p=4510253&preview_id=4510253 <div><img src=”http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/cct-athome-01081.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=574″ class=”ff-og-image-inserted”/></div><p>My views on aging are simple: I plan to put it off. As a black belt in denial, I have been pretty successful with this strategy, except when I haven’t been.</p> <p>Regardless of what I ordain, life changes strike, ready or not. Like the day I was reading the newspaper, and discovered that the only way I could read the shrinking type was to get longer arms. Or the time I was standing in line at the air-conditioned grocery store and my cotton blouse was suddenly soaked with sweat.</p> <p>My latest unwelcome age-related awakening hit me over the holidays in a one-two punch.</p> <p>As DC and I navigated our first married Christmas among our blended family of five grown children, ages 21 to 35, who live in four states, we watched the sands of time shift before our bifocaled eyes.</p> <p>This season my two daughters felt they should see their dad in Colorado for the holiday. Meanwhile, DC’s son and wife, who live nearest us in central Florida, were going to her parents. DC’s daughter, stepson, his wife and their two young children, who all live in Phoenix, wanted us to head their way for Christmas, which made more sense — intellectually, at least — than having them all fly our way.</p> <p>Insert heavy sobs here. “I’m not ready to give up having Christmas at my house,” I told DC. “It’s their turn,” he said, squeezing my hand.</p> <p>That was blow number one. For the first time since I had my children, my family was not going to spend Christmas around my tree.</p> <p>The second blow came with the realization that by marrying DC, I instantly became a grandma.</p> <p>“Am not,” I told DC. “I am too young.” “Sorry,” he said, “and no you’re not.”</p> <p>Ouch. However, the little darlings call me “Glamma,” which I admit, softens the blow.</p> <p>Now that the season is over, and I’ve had a chance to absorb these new blows, I’ve learned my first lesson of the New Year: Just because I think I’m not old enough to be a grandmother or have hot flashes, doesn’t stop time. Life moves. You can either go lightly or stubbornly, but go you will.</p> <p>As I fish around for perspective, I see how home life unfolds in chapters. From children, to newlyweds, to parents, to grandparents, we evolve. So when celebrating holidays for your expanding family, keep these thoughts in mind for the upcoming year:</p> <p><strong>Be realistic.</strong> Newlyweds, kids of divorced parents, new parents and new grandparents, listen up. You cannot be in two places at once. So stop trying. Though you will likely feel pulled to please more than one household, keep guilt and stress to a minimum by accepting the reality that you cannot please everyone. When the holiday comes, celebrate the family members you are with, rather than mourn the ones absent.</p> <p><strong>Don’t overcommit.</strong> Too often, in a desire to please everyone, you suffer. Some years ago, after spending half a holiday sitting in traffic trying to see two families, I learned it’s not worth it. Set clear limits and expectations.</p> <p><strong>Focus more on the present, less on the past.</strong> The best way to weather the changes that come with life is to adapt — quickly. Of course, you will reflect on past holidays, recall loved ones who are no longer around, and feel a twinge of nostalgia. However, when you find yourself dwelling on what is no longer, reframe that sadness with the positive thought of how fortunate you are to have those fond memories. Then focus on creating warm memories for those with you now.</p> <p><strong>Pass the baton.</strong> Once children come on the scene, the torch gets passed from one generation to the next. For older parents, letting go can be tough, but put the little ones first. Go to them.</p> <p><em>Contact Jameson via www.marnijameson.com.</em></p> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 05 Jan 2017 18:00:07 +0000 Marni Jameson article Marni Jameson: Passing the family torch https://www.mercurynews.com/2017/01/05/marni-jameson-passing-the-family-torch/ Focus more on the present, less on the past. http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/cct-athome-01081.jpg?w=1024&h=574 @eastbaytimes http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/cct-athome-01081.jpg?w=640 summary_large_image en-US text/html http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/01/05/marni-jameson-passing-the-family-torch/ Home & Garden Home Column http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/01/04/keeping-plants-safe-in-winter-freezes/ https://www.eastbaytimes.com?p=4508022&preview_id=4508022 <div><img src=”http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/cct-mgcol-0108-01.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=768″ class=”ff-og-image-inserted”/></div><p>Frost damage to plants is the single biggest cause of economic loss to crops in the United States – far surpassing any other weather related issue. While frost doesn’t impact the home gardener on the same scale, it can be disheartening to lose plants in a sudden freeze.</p> <p>Citrus, succulents, newly planted or tender perennials, and many tropical and subtropical plants all are vulnerable.</p> <p>Frost damage occurs when the water inside the cells of a plant freeze, causing damage to the cellular walls, which degrades the overall health of the plant. Affected plants will wilt and in severe or prolong periods of frost, die.</p> <p>Shoots, buds and flowers will wither and turn brown or black as if they have been scorched. Even bark can crack or split and die off.</p> <p>Young, newly planted, specimens are especially vulnerable.</p> <hr/><p><em>Reading this on your phone? Stay up to date on Bay Area and Silicon Valley news with our new, free mobile app. Get it from the <a href=”http://bayareane.ws/mercappleapp” target=”_blank”>Apple app store</a> or the <a href=”http://bit.ly/mercgoogleapp” target=”_blank”>Google Play store</a>.</em></p> <hr/><p>We  already have had several days of frost and freeze here in the Bay Area, and it looks like more is on the way. So, how do you protect your prized citrus, succulents, rhododendrons and azaleas?</p> <p>If a severe freeze, or multiple days of below freezing weather is expected, water 2 to 3 days ahead of time. This will increase the soil’s ability to retain and give off heat.</p> <p>Wrapping trunks of young trees with blankets, towels or piping insulation will provide added protection.</p> <p>If you are doing container gardening and are able to pull pots into the garage, shed or other enclosed area, that would be ideal. Otherwise, move them up against the side of the house or garage, preferably beneath an overhang.</p> <p>Stringing your plants with old-fashioned, incandescent Christmas lights –not LEDs — can be very helpful. Covering the lighted plants with frost cloth, sheets or blankets will add 4 to 8 degrees of protection, enough to keep most plants alive.</p> <p>Frost cloth is lightweight enough to leave on for several days, however heavier covers should be removed each day once the temperature has warmed up, and then reapplied each night before sunset.</p> <p>Make sure the cover goes all the way to ground in order to capture the radiant heat from the soil. Also, stake heavier covers so that the weight won’t break branches, damage the leaves or suffocate the plant. You can also use inverted boxes, buckets and plant pots.</p> <p>Adding a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch around your plants can also help, but be sure to stay several inches away from the trunk or stem; mulching too close will cause the plant to rot.</p> <p>There are many varieties of foliar sprays available today that claim to protect against frost. Although recent field trials have shown no real harm in using them, they also show have found little to no actual protection from these products. You are better off using other methods to keep your plants safe.</p> <p>Wait until all chance of frost has passed before trimming off any damaged or diseased branches. Pruning too soon can cause significantly more trauma, even death, to a young, vulnerable plant that might otherwise have recovered in the spring.</p> <p><em>Rebecca Jepsen is a Santa Clara County Master Gardener.</em></p> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 04 Jan 2017 18:00:41 +0000 Rebecca Jepsen article Keeping plants safe in winter freezes https://www.mercurynews.com/2017/01/04/keeping-plants-safe-in-winter-freezes/ It’s been a cold winter so far, and there likely is more freezing weather to come. http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/cct-mgcol-0108-01.jpg?w=1024&h=768 @eastbaytimes http://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/cct-mgcol-0108-01.jpg?w=640 summary_large_image en-US text/html http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/01/04/keeping-plants-safe-in-winter-freezes/ Home & Garden Lifestyle Garden Column

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